Sheet Metal Forming Simulation
Case Studies

Williams Tooling Case Study 

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The client provided solid models of a two-stage forming process and required simulation to determine feasibility and blank development. The predicted splits were solved by adjusting the draw form shape in the localized problem area and allowing it to be re-struck in the second form. Using simulation, it was shown that this was a successful countermeasure.

Williams Tooling, Dorr MI, is a regular client who uses StampingSimulation.com's SimulateLite® service to simulate their solid tool designs prior to commencing fabrication.

"Since incorporating StampingSimulation.com's™ services into our company, we have seen a significant reduction in time spent in tool tryouts, often avoiding time consuming changes by getting a good result at first tryout." - Jeremy Dutkiewicz - Williams Tooling, MI USA

Simulation Video- Click on the image to play

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Figure 1: Product Design
Solid models of a two-stage forming process were provided by the client, and their objective was to use simulation to assess overall feasibility and to properly develop and blank.

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Figure 2: Blank Shape
The Simulation was used to calculate an accurate blank shape.

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Figure 3: Tool
When running a simulation, it is necessary to create the tooling (in this case, a Progression Tool) to use in the simulation.

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Figure 4: Splits predicted
Splits were predicted during simulation, and they were solved by adjusting the draw form shape and having it re-struck in the second form. Without simulation, resolving this issue would have been far more time consuming.  

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Figure 5: Final Simulated Part
Waviness is picked up in the simulation but is accepted because of later re-trim operation.

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Figure 6: Final Actual Part 
The waviness matches the simulation.